CDT & Gamma GT Tests

 

CDT

CDT or Carbohydrate-deficient transferring is an iron-transporting protein found naturally in the body which was first identified as a biochemical marker of heavy alcohol consumption in 1979. 

 

It is known that individuals who are experienced heavy drinkers tend to have elevated levels of CDT and that the level of CDT is roughly proportional to the level of drink consumption, i.e. the higher the level, the more that has been consumed.  A detailed review of all scientific publications between 1976 and 2000 reached the conclusion that “CDT is the most specific marker for chronic alcohol abuse to date.”

Based partially on this finding CDT levels are requested and used by the DVLA when decisions are being made to reinstate driving licences to individuals  who have been disqualified for alcohol related matters.

 

In addition CDT levels can be monitored in some family Court matters such as deciding upon the custody of minors.

 

If you need CDT levels or the factors that can affect them to be considered on behalf of your client by our drink drive experts or would like a quote for a BAC calculation please give us a call. 

 

Gamma GT Tests

Gamma GT or gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase is an enzyme that is found naturally in the body.  It is known that individuals who are experienced heavy drinkers tend to have elevated levels of Gamma GT and that the level of Gamma GT is roughly proportional to the level of drink consumption, i.e. the higher the level, the more that has been consumed.  Gamma GT levels have been found to take time to build up.  Therefore one heavy drinking session will not normally result in a high Gamma GT level, but regular heavy drinking will push the Gamma GT levels up.  Similarly Gamma GT levels do not fall to zero immediately upon alcohol being absent from the body.  The fall will take time, usually a number of weeks, and may depend upon how long a period of heavy drinking has taken place over. 

Gamma GT levels can be influenced by various medical conditions such as diseases of the liver, biliary tract and the pancreas.  These conditions would usually be known to an individual’s doctor.  In addition some drugs can induce a rise in Gamma GT levels.  For advice on this or a traditional BAC calculation call Formedecon.

Formedecon Ltd
Unit 13 Enterprise City
Meadowfield Avenue
Spennymoor
Co. Durham
DL16 6JF
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook
  • Instagram
Tel : 01388 811003